Punk Pioneers Needs YOUR Help Thanks

Punk Pioneers Needs YOUR Help Thanks

Punk Pioneers by Jenny Lens, MFA. Blondie (2/77), Dee Dee Ramone backstage Whisky with Jenny Lens (2/77), Terry Graham (Bags, Gun Club) and Belinda Go-Go in trash bag (8/77), Randettes (Alice Bag, Exene, Connie Clarksville, Sheila, Trudie T Rudie, Nickey Beat and where is Spazz Attack?) (3/78), Whisky, Go-Go’s, Starwood backstage (1/80), Exene, Decline filming, Club 88 (3/80),The CLASH!, England (6/80), and Rodney Bingenheimer and Joan Jett (1980). Just a tiny fraction of my archive, 1976-80. Those who help keep this punk archive alive (NOT just photos, but mags and more), I send my eternal gratitude. I know some are struggling financially. I get it. Why am I posting this? Cos I’ve spent a lotta time and lost a LOTTA money dealing with my punk archive. Trying to find a home for it. Shall I die and it remains homeless? No, I’m not donating it. That’s rude to me. Why should YOU have the fruits of my labor which put me into debt many times and I get nothing? FU. So All of you who love my work but don’t support the artist, you are mean and selfish. Why can’t you bother to post my pix and tell ppl? Why won’t you tell ppl to remember my pix for gifts or home/office decor. You don’t throw a few bucks my way. What is WRONG with you? I never made money. #GetReal. This archive is endangered due to FINANCES. I’ve put myself into debt COS OF MY PUNK PIX. #Truth The rest of you, who haven’t Donated or bought or even shared many times? You expect art for free and the buck...

Creem Magazine and Photographer Jenny Lens

Creem Magazine was THE ROCK magazine. The best of the best was, without a doubt, Creem. Forget Rolling Stone. Corporate and usually dismissive of Punk. Yes, Creem magazine was the BEST ROCK MAG. Ever. Read on to see they didn’t treat me that well, lost slides, but hey, THEY WERE IT. And Creem, of all the mags, deserves to be honored, remembered and most of all, CELEBRATED. Contribute to the documentary fund-raiser, til August 5, 2016! Creem was one of the few magazines who actually put photographer’s names on their masthead. This is a major list of who’s who of rock photography. Note the author of the Creem book is not listed. Yeah. Ok, so why we MUST have THIS version? The TRUTH. Creem magazine and I started our relationship in early 1976. Let’s start at the beginning. Late 1975, while waiting in line at the grocery store, I glanced at a new magazine called “People.” I lived in the northeast corner of the Valley, in Granada Hills. I stopped when seeing a photo of a rather androgynous looking woman. Quoting Rimbaud. I figured any rock n roller who knows the Symbolist poets is someone I want to know. I will never forget first listening to Patti’s “Horses.” My life was totally and irreversibly changed. I wanted to read everything I could about this new thing called “Punk music.” But mainstream media wasn’t having it. They were not fans. Only a handful of magazines and fanzines were covering punk in late 75 and early 76. I also had a disadvantage because I was out in the Valley. We didn’t get a...

Dee Dee Ramone Changed MY Life

I wrote this immediately after we lost Dee Dee on June 5, 2002. I’m crying just opening this file and haven’t re-read it since I wrote it. If not for Dee Dee Ramone, this archive might not exist. For him I picked up a camera and that’s all I can write right now. Bless you, dear, sweet, immensely talented Dee Dee. If only he knew he was so beloved and changed music forever. Forever in our hearts, Dee Dee. June 5, 2002: I got out of the shower Thursday and took the phone from my now ex-husband. People want to know why I got into taking punk photos: I loved Dee Dee Ramone’s cheekbones. My friend Sandy told me he OD’d. I asked if he were dead and when confirmed, let out an anguished cry that surprised both her and I. My depth of sorrow and inconsolable grief overwhelms me. I’ve lost too many of the most important creative people in my life and in our culture and dealt with it, although I sorely miss emailing Tomata du Plenty. I sent a photo of Dee Dee and myself and a close up of his young, sweet, beautiful, sexy face an email to my friends starting with “now I wanna sniff some glue.” The most powerful line they ever wrote and sung was “all the kids want something to do.” A truer statement was never said. You don’t have to be a kid to feel it. It’s the reason we turn to rock ‘n’ roll. It’s why great rock comes from the street. No one was closer to the street than...

Jenny Lens: Ramones Numero Uno Fan, Street Life

by Richard Schaefer in Lisa Fancher’s “Street Life” fanzine. Proof I was the Ramones “numero uno fan and famous paparazzi in her own right.” In EARLY 1977!! Tantalizing sounds of the skirmishes of desire, of lips surrendering cheap kissed in the other room, brought torture to anyone who listened. We stood between the jungle and the stars, both of us trying to keep our balance as we fought. DEE DEE was a madman at my throat an my eyes, trying to gouge them out. At last he got me right in the eyes, his fingers sinking in . . . My brain seemed to burst and I saw “Carbona Not Glue.” He was still in my eye sockets, still digging in! My brain felt ripped open. Then I saw a little out of my left eye. It was BLONDIE! She cursed and panted in frenzy trying to come in for the kill. My hand went for that sensuous mouth. I wanted her kiss-print. She clenched her teeth and sun keep “In the Flesh” on my hand. I had never seen a more beautiful, ravaging animal. She bellowed with laughter and staggered back toward the punch-bowl. Rock and Roll was re-born at the SCREAMERS house in Hollywood. It was 2 in the morning as the party was just starting. Up the winding, vinyl staircase they came, NEW YORK, TOKYO, ROME, SEATTLE, PARIS and AZUZA, dueling with EL LAY’S punk elite to honor the RAMONES and BLONDIE on their successful Whiskey A Go Go gig. The boppers were bopping. JIMMY DESTRI, keyboards for BLONDIE, was the first to make an entrance,...

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